Murdoch, I-Level and… Claudine dominate media in 2010

Vince Cable pictured in The Independent


In terms of
commercial media, 2010 was always going to be dominated by one man and one
company: Rupert Murdoch, News Corporation.

From the
outset we expected paywalls and bundled content offerings (Alesia) to be the
order of the day, but no one could have foreseen just where we find ourselves
today.

Vince
Cable, business secretary of Britain’s
first coalition Government since 1945, has realised it pays to keep
warmongering in check
, although there could be some soul-searching at Telegraph Media Group this yule-tide too.

Murdoch’s
Project Alesia is gone
, along with Ian Clark and a number of other once
prominent executives, while debate continues to rage about the success of News
International’s paywalls
.

WPP’s Sir
Martin Sorrell
has not been alone in doing a U-turn on the viability and
likelihood of paywalls
in the 21st Century, although The Guardian’s Alan Rusbridger continues to talk a great game.


But I’ll
keep it brief, (still have presents to wrap), so before I sign off for another
year, I thought you might be interested in Media Week’s most read stories of
2010.

Measured in
terms of unique users, not page impressions, the top five stories are not the
ones I would have necessarily picked, but certainly tell a story of their own. All were
accessed by more than 10,000 browsers – in some cases closer to 20,000 – which
might give those naked souls at MediaCom food for thought, let alone the
fantastic Claudine.

The success
of such stories, coupled with Media Week’s biggest awards ceremony for many
years, is testament to the strength and resilience of the brand, and the UK’s commercial
media community in general.

Things
promise to be equally interesting in 2011, with TV product placement in the
offing, mobile finally coming of age, and social media platforms becoming fully
commercialised.

Yet, for all
the young upstarts and disruptive media and technology that is sure to come, I suspect
much of the agenda will continue to be centred around the operations of one
particular media mogul
, who’ll be 80 years-old in March.

Wishing
everyone a very Merry Christmas and a prosperous new year.

Media Week’s most read in 2010

I-level
placed into administration

My Media
Week: Claudine Collins MediaCom

MediaCom
bares all for charity calendar

Times loses
1.2 million readers

Career
women make bad mothers slogan fronts new outdoor push

Ones to
watch: the next Facebooks